Posts Tagged ‘Reverse Mortgages’

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4 Misconceptions About Reverse Mortgages — and Why You May Decide You Want One

February 15, 2017

4 Misconceptions About Reverse Mortgages -- and Why You May Decide You Want OneWith so many mortgage products available on the market, it can be hard to know which ones will serve you best as a homeowner. As a result, there are many mistruths surrounding the reverse mortgage products. If you’ve heard of this homeownership option and are wondering what it can do for you, let’s clear away some of the misconceptions.

You Must Own Your Home

It can certainly be helpful to own your home outright if you’re looking into a reverse mortgage, but it’s not actually necessary. Instead, it’s important for you to have a high amount of equity in your home so that lenders can be sure that you’re a solid financial bet. While the balance you should have on your home varies based on a number of conditions, it’s important to talk to your lender for the specific details involved.

Few Conditions Apply

You may have heard that any homeowner who acquires a reverse mortgage must be 62 years of age or older, but because a reverse mortgage is a mortgage product, there are a number of requirements involved in order to apply. In addition to having enough equity in your home, it must be your primary residence and you will have to prove that you can pay the property taxes, insurance charges and any maintenance costs consistently.

Home Ownership Is Relinquished

Due to the nature of reverse mortgages, many people believe that this type of loan gives the bank ownership of your home. However, the homeowner retains ownership because they are borrowing money against the value of the equity in their home. This means that as long as the payments on the home are maintained, the home will continue to belong to the homeowner.

Expensive Loan Fees

While reverse mortgages can come with more expensive rates because the monthly payments are deferred, it’s important to talk to a mortgage lender about these details to determine what they’ll mean for you. The associated fees will depend on the price of your home, your loan type and your interest rate, so you’ll need to be aware of what the costs are to you before moving forward.

There is a lot of information out there regarding reverse mortgages, but it’s important to do the research so you can be aware of how this product can benefit you. If you’re currently considering this type of mortgage, contact your trusted mortgage professionals for more information.

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Understanding the Reverse Mortgage and How to Use It to Pay Off a Regular Mortgage

January 6, 2017

Understanding the Reverse Mortgage and How to Use It to Pay Off a Regular MortgageThere are a variety of mortgage products out there that serve the needs of different homeowners, but for the uninitiated it can be hard to know what will work best for them. If you happen to be close to retirement and are looking at options that will be more financially beneficial for you, here are the details on a reverse mortgage and how this product can work for you.

The Details On A Reverse Mortgage

A reverse mortgage may be one of the lesser-known products available on the market, but it was created in 2009 as the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage for Purchase (HECM) following the 2008 recession. While this type of mortgage is only available to homeowners who are 62 or older, it offers a way for people to tap into the equity of their home so that they are not required to pay monthly mortgage payments. There are limitations imposed on this product, but this can be useful for many homeowners.

What’s Required To Apply?

In order to utilize this mortgage product, the homeowner must have paid off their property entirely or have a significant amount of equity in their current home. As people who want to use a reverse mortgage will have to go through a credit check, they will have to be able to prove that they have the ability to pay for all the fees associated with home ownership. This can include common expenses like insurance, property tax and any other applicable charges that come with a monthly mortgage payment.

How You Can Use It

A reverse mortgage can be confusing to understand, but for those who want to receive monthly payments, get a lump sum payment from their equity or even access a line of credit, it can be a means of tapping into additional funds. While this means that the overall loan balance of the mortgage can increase over time due to interest and insurance not being paid consistently, these expenses will be taken care of once the owner has passed away when the property can be sold or the loan balance is paid.

A reverse mortgage can be a beneficial product for many homeowners, but it’s important to be aware of the associated costs involved to determine if this product is beneficial for you. If you’re currently considering a reverse mortgage, contact one of our mortgage professionals for more information.

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Reverse Mortgages 101: How This Unique Financial Product Can Make Your Life Easier

November 8, 2016

Reverse Mortgages 101: How This Unique Financial Product Can Make Your Life EasierIf you’ve been in your home for a while and have considered other loan options, you may have heard the term reverse mortgage without being aware of how this product can benefit you. While this type of mortgage works for those who have a high amount of equity in their home, here are the details on reverse mortgages and how this product may work for you.

What’s A Reverse Mortgage?

The reverse mortgage was created in 2009 as the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage for Purchase (HECM) and is something that can be used by those who are older than 62. As this type of mortgage does not require the homeowner to pay monthly mortgage payments, it enables those who use it to repay their loan after they move out or pass on. If the cost of maintaining your home is manageable and you don’t plan on moving, this can be a useful option.

The Requirements For Reverse Mortgages

Beyond the age requirement, those who want to utilize this product need to own their current property or have a high amount of equity in it. They must have the ability to pay any insurance and property tax on the home, and they must comply with the standards that are set by the Federal House Administration (FHA). This means that applicants may require documentation like bank statements to confirm their financial security, or even pay stubs if they are still receiving a monthly income.

The Pros And Cons

A reverse mortgage can be an option for those who don’t want to make a regular monthly payment on their home and would like to turn it into a source of additional funds while still owning it. While this can be an option to for those who want to stabilize their monthly expenditures, it’s also important to be aware that there can be higher costs associated with a reverse mortgage. In addition to a higher interest rate, reverse mortgages incur a higher overall interest payment since monthly payments are deferred until the loan is paid in full.

There are many types of mortgage products out there on the market, but you may not be aware that a reverse mortgage or the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage for Purchase (HECM) can be a useful option for many seniors. If you are wondering if this option is right for you, contact your trusted mortgage professional for more information.

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Can You Use a Reverse Mortgage to Buy Your Next Home? Yes, and Here’s How

September 2, 2016

Can You Use a Reverse Mortgage to Buy Your Next Home? Yes, and Here's HowMost people who have been on the market for a home are familiar with what the term ‘mortgage’ means, but many have not heard of a reverse mortgage and aren’t aware of how this product can benefit them. If you’re nearing retirement and are contemplating a new home or even relocation to another community, here are the details on a reverse mortgage and how this option may benefit you.

What Is A Reverse Mortgage?

While many homeowners may not have the net worth to be able to buy another home without selling their current one, a reverse mortgage enables the buyer to borrow money against the value of their home. Created in 2009 as the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage for Purchase (HECM), this type of mortgage can enable those older than 62 to relocate to a new house or move closer to their family without having to sacrifice the money they’ve saved or their fixed monthly income.

What Are The Requirements?

Beyond the minimum age requirement of 62 years of age, those who would like to utilize a reverse mortgage must either own the current property they are living in or have a high amount of equity in the property. They must be able to pay all of the costs associated with ownership of the home and the property they are purchasing must be able to pass the standards held by the Federal House Administration (FHA). In addition, applicants will have to go through a financial assessment to ensure they can make insurance and property tax payments.

The Benefits And Drawbacks Of Reverse Mortgages

A reverse mortgage can be a great benefit in that it enables those who are in their senior years to purchase a new home without having to utilize a portion of their fixed monthly income. However, because a reverse mortgage includes this benefit, it also comes in tandem with a higher loan balance and this higher balance means that interest will accrue more quickly. Dependent on this amount, this can actually diminish the equity in the home.

While the opportunity for a reverse mortgage has been around for a number of years, this alternative for purchasing a home has not been utilized by many homeowners since its inception in 2009. If you’re approaching your senior years and are considering the benefits of purchasing a new home, you may want to contact your local mortgage professional for more information.

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Three Tips to Ensure That a Reverse Mortgage Makes Sense for Your Financial Situation

April 14, 2016

Three Tips to Ensure That a Reverse Mortgage Makes Sense for Your Financial SituationIf you’re having financial troubles, or if you need to free up a large sum in a short period of time, a reverse mortgage is a great way to get the money you need without having to take on new debt or make monthly payments. When you apply for a reverse mortgage – also known as a home equity conversion mortgage – you’re essentially borrowing money from the equity you’ve built up in your house. The great advantages of a reverse mortgage are that you don’t need to make any loan payments until you decide to move out of the house and that in spite of the interest rates attached, you’ll never owe more than the value of your home.

However, there are tight restrictions and requirements with respect to who can get a reverse mortgage and what needs to be done before you receive any money. In order to qualify, you must meet an age requrement and the property must be your primary residence. You also can’t owe more money on the property than it is worth.

So how can you tell if a reverse mortgage is a good solution for you? Here are three factors you’ll want to consider.

Will You Use The Money Responsibly?

In general, the high-cost, high-risk nature of a reverse mortgage makes it ideal for people who are having trouble meeting their everyday living expenses. That means you’ll need to ensure you use the money responsibly. Good uses of reverse mortgage funds include paying living expenses and medical costs when no other options are available, and paying for emergency care after a serious injury if you’re uninsured.

Have You Exhausted All Other Avenues?

A reverse mortgage can have significant upfront costs. The fees may be higher than other loans, which means even if you don’t actually use any of the credit you obtain through a reverse mortgage, you’ll still may be paying a large sum out of pocket. Furthermore, your lender has the authority to recall the loan if you let your home insurance expire, if you fall behind on your property taxes or home maintenance, or if you spend a full year in an assisted living facility.

These risk factors mean that a reverse mortgage is typically best used as a last resort. If you have other options – for instance, if you have stocks or investments you can cash out, or if you can sell your home to your children and then rent it back from them – you’re better off going down another route. But if you’ve already exhausted all other options, a reverse mortgage may make sense.

Are You Planning To Stay In Your Home For The Foreseeable Future?

A reverse mortgage generally works best for people who intend to stay in their homes for several years. When you get a reverse mortgage, you’ll need to take out insurance to protect against the possibility of your loan balance growing beyond your property value. That means you’ll need to pay monthly insurance premiums – and if you only plan to stay in your home for a short period of time before selling, it’s very unlikely that your loan balance will grow beyond the value of your home.

A reverse mortgage can be a convenient way to access emergency cash reserves – and when used responsibly, it’s a great tool that can help you to help you with otherwise unmanageable expenses. However, reverse mortgages can also be risky and complicated – and you’ll want to consult a professional before applying for one. Call your local mortgage expert to learn more about whether a reverse mortgage is right for you.

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Retiring Soon? Learn How a Reverse Mortgage Can Add to Your Retirement Security

March 22, 2016

Retiring Soon? Learn How a Reverse Mortgage Can Add to Your Retirement SecurityIf you’re nearing retirement, you’re likely starting to think about your savings and retirement plan and how you can ensure a financially secure retirement. With your peak income-earning years largely behind you, you’ll need to work with what you have in order to ensure a livable retirement income. That’s where a reverse mortgage may be a sensible option.

How does a reverse mortgage work, and how can it help you to have a more financially secure retirement? Here’s what you need to know.

A Reverse Mortgage Is Tax-Free And Saves Your Social Security Benefits

Social Security benefits offer a basic form of income for senior citizens, but if you tap into your Social Security too early in your retirement, you could use up your available benefits in a short span of time. Deferring Social Security until later on in your retirement means that you’ll get an extra 7 to 8 percent per year you defer, which is why you’ll want to save your Social Security for as long as possible. But in order to do that, you need another income source to live on.

A reverse mortgage is a tax-free income source that you can use to fund the early part of your retirement, allowing your Social Security benefits to mature. Best of all, a reverse mortgage frees up your budget so you can invest more of your funds and collect returns later.

You’ll Never Owe More Than Your Home’s Value – And There’s No Set Repayment Date

A lot of loans have high interest rates and fixed repayment periods. This means that if you use credit cards or take out a personal loan, for instance, you’ll be locked into a set repayment date or won’t have a high enough borrowing limit – or if you do have a high borrowing limit, you’ll find that interest charges quickly add up.

Reverse mortgages have no set repayment date, which means that you can use the money from a reverse mortgage as needed without having to worry about repayment. You’ll also never owe more on your reverse mortgage than what your home is worth, so you’ll never find yourself underwater.

A reverse mortgage is a great way to ensure that you have a safe, stable retirement – and it can add an extra layer of security on top of your social security benefits. Are you considering taking out a reverse mortgage on your home? A qualified mortgage advisor can help – contact a mortgage professional near you to learn more.

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Understanding the Principal Limit on a Reverse Mortgage and What Happens if You Reach It

November 12, 2015

Understanding the Principal Limit on a Reverse Mortgage and What Happens if You Reach ItIf you’re considering applying for a reverse mortgage, you’ll want to ensure you understand certain critical factors. One such factor is the principal limit. The principal limit will have a strong influence on your finances, which is why you’ll need to ensure you know – before applying for your reverse mortgage – what your principal limit is.

So how does a principal limit work, and how can you find out what yours is? Here’s what you need to know.

Principal Limit: The Maximum Amount You Can Borrow

Simply put, the principal limit is the maximum amount of money that you can borrow using a reverse mortgage. This maximum amount does not change if you pay off your reverse mortgage and then apply for a second one – rather, it’s a lifetime maximum that is calculated per-borrower. The principal limit is nationally legislated through the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Calculating Your Principal Limit Factor

Calculating your principal limit factor is fairly simple. The Department of Housing and Urban Development maintains a chart that shows you what your principal limit factor is. To look up your principal limit factor, all you need are your expected rate and the age of the youngest spouse in the home.

The principal limit factor is useful in determining what kind of a loan you can get. The size of the loan you can expect to receive is equal to your home’s value multiplied by the principal limit factor.

For example, a 72-year-old who owns a $300,000 home with a 10-year interest rate of 3% and a lender margin of 3% has a 6% “effective rate”. According to the table, a 72-year-old with a 6% effective rate will have a principal limit factor of 46.7%. That means the most this borrower can receive through a reverse mortgage is $140,100 – which is 46.7% of $300,000.

What Happens If You Reach The Principal Limit?

If you reach your principal limit, you will have exhausted all of the money available to you through a reverse mortgage – you will have used up all of your equity. A reverse mortgage is a non-recourse loan, which means your lender cannot pursue you or your heirs to recoup their money. In the event that you choose to sell the property, all of the proceeds will go to the reverse mortgage issuer – none of it goes to the homeowner.

A reverse mortgage can be an effective financial tool, but if you use up all of your equity, it may paint you into a financial corner. An experienced mortgage advisor can help you to determine if a reverse mortgage is an appropriate financing option for you. Contact your trusted mortgage professional today to learn more.