Posts Tagged ‘Mortgages and Credit’

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Your Debt-To-Income Ratio and How It Affects Your Mortgage

April 5, 2017

Your Debt-To-Income Ratio and How It Affects Your MortgageWhen you’re delving into the market in the hopes of finding your dream home, it’s likely you’ll come across the term debt-to-income ratio. This may not seem important at first, but your DTI is the key to determining the amount of money you can put into your home and just how much you should spend on a monthly basis. If you’re curious about what this means for you, here’s how to calculate it and how it can impact your mortgage.

What’s Your DTI Ratio?

One of the best ways to determine whether or not a home is affordable for you is to first calculate your DTI ratio. To get this amount, add up all of your monthly payments including any credit card, loan and mortgage payments, and divide this amount by your gross monthly income. The amount you get is your DTI percentage and this will help to determine how much your monthly payment should be.

What Does Your DTI Mean?

Your DTI percentage helps to determine the amount of house you can afford on a monthly basis, and this is why it can be such a good way to help you find the right home. While a DTI of 25% or less is ideal, a DTI that rises above 43% may be hard to get financing for since there will be little room for error. When it comes to a higher debt load, approval may come down to what your credit history says about your financial health.

The Amount Of Home You Can Afford

It’s easy to be convinced that your dream home is for you, and worth the splurge, but investing in too much home on a consistent basis can lead to future financial difficulties. If you’re set on a home that has a high monthly payment, you may want to hold off until you’ve saved a larger down payment or revamp your budget so that you can make the investment work for you. It may also be worth continuing the housing search so that you have more flexibility to invest in education, travel or other things down the road.

Your DTI ratio may be unfamiliar now, but this can be a great save when it comes to determining how much home you can afford and what will stretch your limits. If you’re currently looking into your housing options and are curious about what’s available to you, contact your trusted mortgage professionals for more information.

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Wondering How Much Mortgage You Can Afford? Here’s How to Calculate It

January 13, 2017

Wondering How Much Mortgage You Can Afford? Here's How to Calculate ItMany people are aware of the financial commitment that is involved when investing in a home, but what that amounts to is different for every person. From what you can afford to what a lender will allow, there are plenty of details involved in determining the right home for you. If you’re not quite sure what the right price is, here’s how to approach home ownership and determine your debt-to-income.

Calculating Your Debt-To-Income Ratio

You may not know what your DTI ratio is, but it has a lot to with how much home you can afford. In order to calculate this amount, add together all the debts you owe each month and divide them by your monthly pre-tax income. For example, if your credit card is $150 and your rent is $900, your debt amount would be $1050. Divide this amount by your income, say $2500, to get 0.42. This means your DTI ratio is 0.42 or 42%.

What Your DTI Means

While a DTI in the high 20s or low 30s is good, anything that hovers above 43 percent may serve as a red flag to the lender. The lower your DTI ratio is, the more likely it is that a lender will approve your mortgage application since you’ll have the disposable income to deal with financial hurdles. If your dream home has you hovering close to this amount, it may be a sign that it’s a bit out of reach.

How Do You Want To Live?

It’s quite common to be taken over when you find your dream home and decide to commit. However, buying a home is a huge financial commitment, and if you’re buying more than you can afford it may drain your well-being over time. Instead of diving in, determine other expenses that are likely to come up in the next few years, whether it’s travel, a child or a new car. It’s important to have the home you want and budget when buying it, but you’ll still need to financial wiggle room in case something comes up.

There are a lot of factors involved in determining how much house you can afford, but by calculating your DTI ratio and being aware of your spending plans, you’ll be well on your way to an ideal price range. If you’re currently on the market for a home, contact one of our mortgage professionals for more information.

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Mythbusting: Understanding Mortgage Myths and Why They Shouldn’t Hold You Back

December 21, 2016

Mythbusting: Understanding Mortgage Myths and Why They Shouldn't Hold You BackWith the fluctuations in real estate and the increasing cost of home ownership, many people are entering the market with more trepidation these days. Fortunately, there are a number of myths associated with buying a home that may not adversely affect potential homebuyers. If you’re interested in purchasing a home but are unsure about whether it will get approved, here are a few things you may want to dispel.

No Approval With Less Than 20 Percent

While putting 20 percent down can help you avoid having to pay private mortgage insurance, this down payment percentage is still just a suggestion when it comes to mortgages. It’s necessary to put a certain percentage down and be able to drum up the money on your own, but if getting into the market is your priority, buying now may be worth the investment over time. It’s just important to remember that the cost of your monthly payment should be affordable for the long term.

Home Ownership Is Too Expensive

It’s certainly the case that the real estate market is always fluctuating and prices can go up or down, but generally speaking, a home will increase in value over time and that means your monthly payment will be something you can consider an investment. While monthly rent disappears as soon as the calendar month is over, the money you invest into a home month after month builds up your equity and ensures greater stability for your financial future.

You Must Have A Good Credit Report

While it will definitely help your mortgage application if you possess good credit, it’s not necessarily a deal breaker if you don’t. Each mortgage is assessed based on a combination of factors that can include your down payment amount and your debt-to-income ratio, so this means that if you have a higher down payment and a less impressive credit report, you can still be approved. It’s a good idea to pay your bills on time and get your debt down if you’re applying for a mortgage, but there are opportunities for potential buyers who have experienced credit issues.

Home ownership is an important dream for many people, and as a result, there are many myths associated with the mortgage process. However, even if you don’t have 20 percent down or perfect credit, there are still opportunities for improving your financial well-being and investing in a home. If you’re currently looking for a new home, contact one of our mortgage professionals for more information.

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5 Ways That a Mortgage Can Be a Huge Benefit to Your Financial Future

December 8, 2016

5 Ways That a Mortgage Can Be a Huge Benefit to Your Financial FutureFor many people, investing in a house is one of the most important purchases they will make in their lifetime. However, alongside having the comfort of your own home, there are many financial benefits associated with buying in. If you’re currently perusing the market for opportunities, here are some reasons to consider investing a little sooner.

Get Away From Inflation

If you have an adjustable-rate mortgage, your interest rates will certainly fluctuate from time to time, but owning a home actually allows you to guard against the reality of inflation, which can be a significant burden as a renter. While the price of housing and apartment rentals can rise considerably with inflation, your monthly mortgage cost will be relatively fixed.

Hold On To More Of Your Money

Renting may be an easier financial obligation than home ownership, but the money you invest into a home each month contributes to your equity, and this is a benefit for your financial future. While rent money will be gone when the month is over, equity provides a consistent means of building wealth.

Buy At A Lower Price

The cost of home ownership may vary around the country, and while it’s certainly climbing in many urban centers, home prices are lower overall. This means that, instead of having to scrounge for a down payment, you’ll be able to invest a little less and maintain a better bank balance.

Cue The Tax Breaks

Many people hold off on home ownership because of the costs of property tax and maintenance, but there are financial boons outside of the money you invest. When tax time comes, you can receive tax deductions for costs like mortgage interest, property taxes and even private mortgage insurance that make buying in a little easier to bear.

Own A Rental Property

Whether you are a first-time buyer or you’ve delved into the market before, having a home in an up-and-coming neighborhood can also be an option, as this will enable you to rent it out and reap the financial rewards. While this may be a more feasible option later on in life, it can be a means of substantial additional income.

Many people hold off on owning a home because of all the associated costs, but it can be of benefit to buy into the market earlier to reap the financial rewards. If you are currently considering home ownership, contact one of our mortgage professionals for more information.

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3 Simple Tips for Boosting Your FICO Credit Score Before Applying for a Mortgage

December 7, 2016

3 Simple Tips for Boosting Your FICO Credit Score Before Applying for a MortgageThere are a variety of factors that are involved in getting your mortgage approved, but few things will have more of an impact than your FICO score and the credit history that goes along with it. Instead of leaving your score up to chance when submitting your application, here are a few ways that you can boost your financial wellbeing and leave your credit score better off than it was before.

Put More On Your Card

It’s important to put purchases on your credit card that you can afford to pay off consistently, but many people are not aware that how much debt you owe can actually positively contribute to your credit score. While it’s good to use up to 30% of your available debt load, a significantly higher percentage than this can be a signal to lenders that you are experiencing financial difficulties. By putting everyday items on credit, it will be easier to give your score an instant boost.

Clear Your Credit History

Many people who think they have bad credit are too afraid to even review it, but it’s very important to take a look at your credit history when it comes to taking control of your finances and your FICO score. If there happens to be incorrect information on your credit report, this will enable you to contact the appropriate lenders and dispute the charges so they can be corrected prior to your mortgage application. It may not seem significant, but this can actually have a marked impact on the outcome of your application.

Make Your Payments On Time

It’s often the case that those who are struggling with debt may push away the bills altogether and give up on the minimum payment, but it’s very important that the minimum is made to keep your financial health in check. It may take a few months to see the results of putting down this amount before the due date, but it will improve your credit over time and forge good habits for the future.

Your credit score is an important aspect of determining your financial health for lenders, and this means that your credit history is of significant importance when it comes to your mortgage. Instead of leaving it up to chance, ensure that you’re making the minimum payments and correct any discrepancies in your credit report. If you’re currently in the market for a home and are considering your options, contact one of our mortgage professionals for more information.

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Planning to Get a Mortgage in 2017? 4 Reasons Why It’s Time to Start Paying Down Other Debts Now

October 13, 2016

Getting a Mortgage in 2017? 4 Reasons Why It's Time to Start Paying Down Other Debts NowBuying a home is an ideal investment for many people because not only is it a place that belongs to them, it can also be very beneficial financially. While you may be strongly considering buying a home for these reasons, it’s also important to be in good financial health so that your ideal home purchase is within reach. If you’re currently perusing the market for prospects, here are some reasons you should pay down debt before taking the leap into home ownership.

Good Credit History

The amount of your debt load and whether or not you’re paying off your minimum monthly payments has a considerable impact on your mortgage approval, so ensuring that you have good credit history going into the process is important. If you’ve had hiccups with your credit, make sure you go through your credit report prior to submitting your application to determine where you’re at.

Lowering Your Debt-to-Income Ratio

Whether or not you’ve heard the term, your debt-to-income ratio (DTI) has a significant impact on how much house you can afford. Made up of the amount of your monthly debt payment and current house payment, your DTI should be below a certain percentage as this will enable you to afford a higher home payment each month.

Shifting Interest Rates

Getting a mortgage is one thing, but interest rates add more to the monthly amount you’ll owe. A fixed-rate mortgage can seem like a good idea, but if interest rates are low you may end up paying more than you would on a variable rate, which can be hard to predict. As interest rates are a part of home ownership, having lower debt will enable you to deal with these additional costs.

Finding The Right Home

Putting your money into a home can be one of the best purchases you’ll make, but if you’re unable to afford the home you love, it can be a disappointing fact to face. While there are no assurances that paying down debt will enable you to afford your dream home, it can go a long way towards giving you more options that will fit your budget.

Buying a home can be a money saver in the long run, but if you’re struggling to keep up with your debt payments buying into the market can be more of a burden than anything else. If you’re currently paying down debt and considering a home purchase, contact your local mortgage professional for more information.

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Spouse with Bad Credit? 3 Reasons You’ll Want to Consider a Co-signer for Your Mortgage

August 3, 2016

Spouse with Bad Credit? 3 Reasons You'll Want to Consider a Co-signer for Your MortgageObtaining a mortgage can be quite a complicated process even without the financial hurdles, but if your spouse’s credit has experienced a number of difficulties, acquiring a mortgage can be even more of a burden. If you’re concerned about what bad credit will mean for your mortgage and are weighing your options, here are some reasons why it might be important to use a co-signer for your application.

Increasing The Likelihood Of Approval

From getting an education to purchasing your first vehicle, it’s a common occurrence for people to take a loan out at some point in their life. However, getting a loan can be very difficult if you happen to be married to someone with a poor credit history. While having someone you know co-sign your application is not without its risks, it can be a means of securing mortgage financing so that you can move towards a less burdensome financial situation.

Improving A Bad Credit History

It adds stress to the process if you have a partner with a poor credit history, but the benefit of a co-signer is that it can be one of the few opportunities you’ll have to really improve a problematic rating. With a co-signer to vouch for you, you will be able to pay down your mortgage consistently and slowly build your spouse’s credit in a way that will give both of you a lot more financial opportunities in the future.

Building Up Trust

It goes without saying that having a co-signer can be a significant financial risk for the person who chooses to sign for you, but – if approached responsibly – this can be a means of building trust with your family members or friends. While co-signing may be a necessity for your situation, it’s important to be aware that it’s a huge commitment for the person who agrees to it and their support should be seen for the good faith it is.

As co-signing is a considerable responsibility for the person who offers it, it’s important to ensure that purchasing a home is the right financial choice for you before asking someone to vouch for your application. If you’re currently in the process of looking for a new home, contact your trusted mortgage professional for more information.